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Evidence for improving quality of care for IBD patients

08-02-2017

Crohn’s & Colitis Australia (CCA) is pleased to release the ‘Final Report of IBD Audit’ that provides important information for the improvement of health care for people living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).





Crohn’s & Colitis Australia (CCA) is pleased to release the Final Report of IBD Audit that provides important information for the improvement of health care for people living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). 

Crohn’s & Colitis Australia (CCA), the peak national patient body representing people with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, has completed the first national audit of the organisation and provision of IBD care in Australia.  The audit was undertaken to collect evidence on how IBD services vary across Australia and identify the reasons for this variation.

71 hospital sites participated in the audit from all States and the ACT. The results showed a high burden of disease, particularly in those under 40 years of age; inconsistency in care and documentation, and prevalence of hospital admissions and frequent emergency situations. The findings from the audit helped CCA develop Australian IBD Standards 2016 that specify nationally consistent expectations of IBD care for hospitals, healthcare professionals, IBD stakeholders and people living with IBD. 

Francesca Manglaviti, CEO of Crohn’s & Colitis Australia, said the release of IBD Audit Final Report and Standards is an exciting and long-awaited project that will have far reaching impact in changing the current model of reactive care of IBD patients.

“The IBD Audit is an important step towards better quality of care for Australians living with IBD. By highlighting the inconsistencies in IBD care, we have identified a need for improvement and provided the evidence for action”.

The IBD Audit Report and the Australian IBD Standards have been developed as part of the IBD Quality of Care Program, which will also include a survey of patient experience conducted across Australia in 2017.

Dr Paul Pavli, the Chair of IBD Quality of Care Steering committee and also a Director on the board of CCA, said that for the first time the IBD sector has comprehensive, nation-wide information about the quality of IBD services which will help funders, hospitals and clinicians to improve services for people living with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

“The audit showed that a multidisciplinary team of physicians, surgeons and nurses with access to specialised services provided by dietitians, pharmacists and psychologists delivered better health outcomes and had 15% lower rates of admissions through the Emergency Department.”

Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis (collectively known as inflammatory bowel diseases) are chronic and largely hidden autoimmune diseases that affect more than 75,000 Australians, with the number predicted to reach 100,000 by 2020. The IBD Audit and the Australian IBD Standards 2016 were made possible through the support of the Australian Government Department of Health and unrestricted educational grants from Janssen (Janssen-Cilag Pty Ltd) and Ferring Pharmaceuticals.

The IBD Audit Final Report and Australian IBD Standards 2016 are available on the Crohn’s & Colitis Australia’s website here: Final Report of IBD